Archive for March, 2017

Goodbye FFT, hello The Other Cape.

Thursday, March 9th, 2017

 

 

 

 

Well, it’s ALMOST time for me to say goodbye to Food for Thought. The site will still stand, and I will post the occasional OMG Recipe, the recipe so good I just have to print it, or a really good fish story, but mostly I will be working as managing editor of The Other Cape.

If you haven’t already, check it out. Today’s story is once again about Lila Deluca, the 10-year-old Rockporter competing on this season’s MasterChef Junior Thursday nights at 8:00. The photography is gorgeous, and there is a bonus video in which Lila teaches how to make Slime. Upcoming stories will be on Mayflour Confections, Lynzariums Plant Shack, and Cape Ann winter surfing. Follow us!

Nordur, the Veuve Cliquot of salt

Sunday, March 5th, 2017

salt nordur

There is enough swoonable romance surrounding Nordur salt to sell it on its story alone:  Nordur salt has been harvested from the same shallow Icelandic waters of Breiðafjörður bay by the same Danish salt-harvesting methods for 260 years.

The Nordur guys – an incredibly photogenic bunch of blond brawny Icelanders – are committed to sustainable production, and use from start to finish only the region’s natural geothermal energy:  to heat the seawater, and then again to heat the open-air pans and to dry the salt.  The first heating process is done in a tank under sub-atmospheric pressures.  The seawater thus boils at a lower temperature without scorching.  The Nordur people claim this best preserves the Breiðafjörður water’s estimable trace minerals.

The resulting pans of salt are hand-raked and harvested.  The azure-tangerine packaging has won design awards.  

salt box

This is the Veuve Cliquot of salts.  It has a feathery lightness, a sweet saltiness akin to English Maldon Salt, which is similarly produced with seawater and raked by hand, but Nordur has more of all those things – more feathery flakes, like the lightest, prettiest snowflakes.  More minerality.  If salt can taste sweet, Nordur does.  Even my husband, unaware of which sodium brand filled our salt cellar, recently seasoned a piece of chicken, took a bite, and commented, “wow! – even this salt is good!”

 

salt with vanilla ice cream and olive oil

 

A bowl of Nordur on the counter called for me to recreate one of our dessert standards:  vanilla ice cream served with olive oil and sea salt.  First discovered in a Jamie Oliver cookbook, this combination is sublime:  two editions of creamy – the ice cream and olive oil –  laced with the sparkling minerality of high quality sea salt.  Simply serve the ice cream in bowls, pour about a tablespoon of fruity olive oil over each serving, then sprinkle with sea salt.  Before you arch that eyebrow, try it.

Nordur makes a wonderful gift; don’t even wrap it, the box is so pretty.  Imported by Prestige Global Inc. who found the salt while combing the world for high quality, healthy products, Nordur can be found at Salt Traders in Ipswich, MA, and can be easily purchased from their website.  

 

Fragrant Chicken and Rice from Markouk Bread

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

Mahroussie's chicken

You know Mahroussie Jabba as the smiling brunette of Markouk Breads, creating her warm, paper-thin rounds painted in Lebanese aromatics at the Cape Ann Farmers’ Market.  A Gloucester resident of 15 years (Jabba married Gloucester native Richard Jabba 17 years ago), Jabba creates a variety of incredibly high-quality Lebanese products, recipes from her native home in the Bekaa Valley of Lebanon.  My personal favorite is her Lebnah, rounds of yogurt cheese preserved in olive oil.  Jabba spreads the yogurt cheese on warm garlic bread, or on pita with cucumber, fresh tomato and a little onion or scallion.

M's labneh

I bumped into Jabba recently, and she offered me this recipe from her mother.  The basic love in this dish is much like the Singaporean “Chicken Rice” that I published recently:  poach a whole chicken and then cook the rice in that delicious broth.  The rice absorbs the chicken fat becoming a suave, luscious product, nothing at all like the bland, fluffy, white piles beside the protein on many American plates.  

But, Jabba’s mother adds aromatics – cinnamon stick, fresh rosemary, and bay leaves –  to the broth, along with tomato. The rice therefore absorbs that fragrance; it is almost more special than the chicken.  Jabba told me that her mother also makes variations of this dish, stuffing the chicken in advance with seasoned browned lamb or beef and rice, sewing the chicken closed and poaching it like that.  The chicken and meats are served beside the rice when served.  

Jabba’s mother also browns dry vermicelli noodles in butter so that they are dark and crispy, and then adds them to cook with the rice, creating a lovely texture and color to the starch.  

Sometimes Jabba’s mother adds toasted pinenuts to the dish.

Even this simplest edition, like the Singapore “chicken rice,” strikes a kind of collective, nourishing deliciousness that makes everyone keep spooning out more.

Markouk products can be found all year round at Cape Ann Fresh Catch, 46 Commercial St. in Gloucester, MA.

M's chicken and rice

Fragrant Chicken and Rice from Markouk Bread

Serves 6 with rice leftover

Ingredients

1 3-4 pound chicken

Salt

4 tablespoons olive oil

4 cups broth

1 can chopped tomatoes (28 ounces)

2 cups water, approximately

1 cinnamon stick

3-4 sprigs of rosemary

2 bay leaves

Salt to taste

2 cups rice

Toasted pinenuts for garnish (optional)

 

Instructions

  1. Salt the chicken all over.  Add the olive oil to a large dutch oven and heat to medium high.  Add chicken, whole.  Turning the chicken often, brown it well on all sides.  
  2. Add the broth, tomatoes, and enough water so that the liquid almost covers the chicken.  Add the cinnamon, rosemary, and bay leaves (tying them together with string makes them easier to remove.)  Bring to a simmer, cover, and cook for an hour or until the chicken is almost cooked through.  This, of course, depends upon the size of your chicken.  Err on the side of the chicken being cooked completely through, as it will still be fairly moist cooked in this broth, and you don’t want to serve raw chicken.
  3. Remove herb bundle.  Taste the broth for salt and pepper.  Add the rice to the broth.  Cover again, and continue cooking for 20 minutes, or until the rice has absorbed all the liquid.  
  4. To serve:  Some recipes remove the chicken from the bones, but I was going to serve my chicken immediately and it was very hot.  So I removed the chicken from the rice, and cut it into serving pieces.  Spoon all the rice out onto a platter, and cover with the chicken pieces or the boneless chicken meat.  Garnish with pinenuts if using.